Home » JAS4QoL » JAS4QoL – Volume 1(4) (December, 2015) » Learning Science English for the First Time: Feedback from Year-1 Pharmacy Students Learning Pharmaceutical Science English at the Tertiary Level

Learning Science English for the First Time: Feedback from Year-1 Pharmacy Students Learning Pharmaceutical Science English at the Tertiary Level

NISHIOKA Yuichiro,1 SATO Erina,2 FOONG Foo Wah3

1The Museum of Osaka University, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Japan
2Language Department, Imex Language Institute, Imex Japan Co. Ltd., Kyoto, Japan
3Department of English for Pharmaceutical Science Communication, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, Kyoto, Japan

Article first published online: December 31, 2015
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Abstract

Results from a previous study of the Stepwise-stepup Tertiary Science English Educational (SSTSEE) system have been encouraging: students find pharmaceutical science (PS) English (PSE) useful. In this study, we probed further into students’ perception of PSE lectures. First-year students (n=56) of both genders participated in the study at University A. Students followed the PSE lectures using a standard textbook containing learning materials for PSE basics (e.g. numerals, grammar, mathematical equations, chemical elements/compounds, Latin and Greek, etc.) for the first-semester study. After completing 12 lectures, students were given a questionnaire to rank their perceptions on a scale of 1-4 (containing 13 items). The effective response rate was 100%. The two highest ranked items were items 1 and 2 with scores of >3.5 (ca. 90%), followed by other items (in descending order of rank) items 6, 3, 4, 5, 12, 13, 7, and 8 (scores: 3.0-3.5), and the lowest ranked items (in descending order) were items 9, 10 and 11 (scores: 2.0-3.0). In their first exposure to PSE, students (ca. 90%) found the subject/lectures and contents (items 1, 2) and textbook contents/materials (item 4) useful as some felt they had gained some knowledge via PSE learning (item 12) and improved their own pronunciation. This study indicated that the interactive approach resulted in their ability to listen, read, write, think, understand and reproduce PSE basics. Based on the results, students were affirmative about learning PSE using the SSTSEE system as they recognized the usefulness and applicability of PSE in their study and future careers as research personnel and pharmacists.